Challenging Stereotypes (Online writings)

Published October 11, 2014 by djlwsu

How can individuals and society challenge the dissemination of stereotypes; how can the circulation of images that normalize difference, that create the other, be challenged?  What sort of strategies do you see working in terms of counteracting stereotypes, daily jokes or in terms of circulated images within the media.

Last day to participate October 24

***Remember 350-400 words and integrate specifics from readings and course materials

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10 comments on “Challenging Stereotypes (Online writings)

  • We can’t always stop the spread of racism but instead we can always talk about it and question it. Being Latino, I’m usually always the only non white person in group activities and i don’t ever feel uncomfortable because i usually hang out with people outside of my circle (race) so i’m used to it, that is until these groups talk about race, in good and bad ways. I feel as if i speak up i’m out numbered. Reading “Why I Don’t Want To Talk About My Race,” i can relate to Steve Locke. For example, I play soccer and everyone is white except for me. I don’t feel uncomfortable at all until i get questions like “why are Mexicans so good at soccer” or things related to Mexicans. At first i did feel uncomfortable but reading “Why I Want To Talk About Race, and Why You Should, Too” i realized it is important to talk about it instead of ignoring it because you are basically educating the other person about your race, they’ll start to step in your shoes, question their thoughts and think about those stereotypes. Of course this isn’t everyone but one step at a time is good enough.Dealing with stereotypes, jokes, and images, I do believe the only way to counteract with these is to set a limit. I honestly love stereotype jokes, heck I will always make jokes about my own race. It’s good to laugh at ourselves. Why is it not okay to make a racial joke but not okay to make a joke about other subjects? One may be concerned with another subject then their race. Race of course does matter, but if I meet someone for the first time I won’t pay attention to their race, more of their character instead. It really all depends on the person and especially setting a limit in general. If we laugh, talk, and set a limit on stereotypes and jokes I do believe that we will be able to handle situations much better.

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  • We can minimize race but unfortunately we cannot completely wipe it out, Racism will always be a part of society unfortunately. We have dramatically reduced racism within the past 100 years by ending segregation, white flagging in housing areas, and eliminating superior and inferior outlooks among races. My high school is in a small country town, mainly consisting of white people. It’s a nice and friendly town for then most part but deep down in the heart of the town, there is still racism among the friendly faces of the town. The town is unintentionally separated between those of Mexican ethnicities and those of White ethnicities. Housing is separated into white neighborhoods and Mexican neighborhoods. Also at school, White kids and Mexican kids didn’t sit with each other or play any of the same sports. It was like racism was promoted in my home town because no one involved the Mexican’s in anything; sports, mixed events, parties, dances, ect. I remember I would drive by the community hall and see either a party with either Mexican people or White people, never both. The only relationship they have between each other is that the Mexican people work for the White people on the dairy farms. I believe racism between different races can be significantly reduced by promoting equality among people by showing that people are the same no matter their race or wealth. This can be accomplished through social media and advertising. Instead of having “white comedies” and “black comedies” they should be mixed race comedies. Or using celebrity influence to promote equality among races. Just like how Martin Luther King promoted equality among people back in the 60’s, people need to play the same role and promote the end of racial differences among people. Also talking about racial differences would address the issues we are currently facing between races. People look at racial differences and stereotypes as normal and part of everyday life. What people need to realize is that they are not normal and all races are different yet equal.

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  • A way we can prevent these pictures and other types of media is by making people who post racial images, have them give a good reasoning for posting it online. Also, when people say stereotypical things we need to have the “what you did..?” conversation like Jay Smooth encourages us to do. We say stereotypical things all the time, without even knowing. It is because we use it so much and in many ways where it is normalized. Something that we can do on a daily to try and control this is, if you notice someone using a stereotype, talk about it with them. That is all you can really do. Police cannot arrest you for saying things of that nature, so we as a society have to change it. Educate one another on the topic. Tell them why it’s not a good thing. Or how it can affect people’s feelings, and potentially their life. I think the reason why it is normalized is because it can be funny at times. People even make fun of their own race, just to get laughs. Comedians, like Louis CK from the video, do it all the time. Almost every comedian does it. It brings humor to people but at the same time can hurt people. I am guilty of saying things like that, I still do. I do not use them as much as I use to because since this class and another, I have learned to think before I speak, and stay aware of my surroundings. So overall, there is no way we are going to stop it all. Most likely it never will be stopped, because it is normal, but we can try and contain it. We just need to educate our youth, about the consequences of these actions, and encourage them to do the right thing and start trying to reduce the use of stereotyping, through media and in regular communication.

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  • I think the first thing individuals can do to challenge the dissemination of stereotypes is to reflect back upon themselves and see how they might be either fulfilling a negative stereotype or judging others based upon stereotypes. To fix any problem such as the dissemination of stereotypes you must start at the root which is yourself. Once you have figured out how you can stop spreading stereotypes then you should look at larger groups such as a group of friends or a sports team and encourage them to also stop the spread of stereotypes. To stop the circulation of stereotypical images and images that try to normalize our differences we should just try to be more noticeable of it. If we start to notice things that emphasize stereotypes we can talk to our friends and family about how they are wrong and how that those images are only tearing our society down as a whole, rather than pushing forward and accepting everyone no matter what differences they could possibly have. The best strategy I see working to counteracting stereotypes is simply not to take part in spreading the stereotype. You don’t want to emphasize people breaking through the stereotype because many people will just end up replying with “well they are an exception.” Another way to fight through stereotypes is to actually be educated on the topic and be able to explain to someone spreading stereotypes how that their claim is not valid in today’s day and age. Stopping the spread through media will be a lot harder than stopping it in your daily life. Unless you are involved in the media really the only thing you can do is encourage the people around you to be aware of stereotypes and how to counteract them. Stereotypes will be around as long as people are not taking individual action to stop them. It may not seem helpful just to make sure you cut out stereotypes from your life and encouraging your friends to also challenge the dissemination of stereotypes, but the dissemination of stereotypes like every other major movement must start somewhere. It may not be a huge accomplishment at first, however if everyone stopped believing and spreading stereotypes before you know it they will be gone.

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  • There are many stereotypes in our lives on a daily basis. I feel like there is way an individual and society can challenge the dissemination of stereotypes. You will find anything happening around the world about any stereotypes just due to the fact the internet allows the rapid dissemination information on there. Some stereotypes can be visible to us or not. There are many stereotypes that are hurting and damaging people lives, which make it harder for them. “When you see a kid walking down the street — particularly a dark-skinned kid like my son Cruz, who I constantly yelled at when he was going out wearing a damn hoodie or those pants around his ankles, ‘Take that hood off!’ — people look at you, and what’s the instant identification? What’s the instant association? It’s those crime scene surveillance tapes,” Another quotes, “When you see a black or a Latino youngster — particularly on the street — you walk to the other side of the street. You try to avoid that confrontation. Trayvon Martin, you know, God bless him, he was an innocent kid, a wonderful kid, a box of Skittles in his hand. He didn’t deserve to die. But I’ll bet you money, if he didn’t have that hoodie on, that nutty neighborhood watch guy wouldn’t have responded in that violent and aggressive way.” In this reading where these quotes came from, “A Fight For Trayvon is a Fight Against Stereotypes” shows how individuals, society and us spread stereotypes rapidly. I think that stereotypes are made by others especially the media. For society to be able to make stereotypes disappear would be remarkable but highly impossible. In the videos of “Shopping While Black” showed a way that the media has strategies to get people to notice how they react when one acts on a stereotype and how some people will do nothing at all to stop or help the situation. I honestly think it’s a way of life, which is impossible to change. It will take years for all the judgmental and stereotypical thoughts in other people’s minds to vanish, all that is able to do is hope for a change in our people, which make our society as one.

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  • When stereotyping an individual we are not always aware that we are stereotyping based on what race that individual is. In order to challenge the spread of stereotypes I think we first need to question where they came from. In class we discussed how even mascots of a sport team arise stereotypes of a race. The video, “In Whose Honor?” it states that the American Indian population across the United States is relatively small, but the popularity of Indian names and images used for sports and on TV effects what people know and think about Indians. Those who are not personally effected by a stereotype may not see how offensive it can be, for example in the video Ken Boyle, the University of Illinois Trustee, states that he doesn’t consider “the chief” as the mascot for their University but is part of the heritage and tradition of the school. Charlene Teters, a graduate student at the University, and her children coming from the descent of American Indian didn’t agree with Boyle’s statement, Teters and her children found it offensive. Charlene Teters standing up against the blatant mockery of Indians is a great example of what we should be doing as individuals and society to challenge the dissemination of stereotypes. By standing up you are making others aware of whom the stereotype is directed towards and how it is offensive to them.
    Images that stereotype certain races such as blacks always being considered thugs or assuming Asians all have “squinty” eyes and are studios are what normalize difference, separating races from each other. I think we can challenge the normalization of differentiating races by making people aware of what the stereotypes are that are normalizing the differences. We need to be aware that stereotypes are not what define a race. Stereotypes I don’t think will ever go away, but by becoming aware that an Individual is not defined by a stereotype of their race, we can eliminate normalization of difference. Strategies that help counteract stereotypes through social media are people who are speaking up and shining light on how certain stereotypes and jokes can be offensive. It is good to be able to take humor in yourself, for me as a white female, I take humor in the stereotype of a “typical white girl,” but other stereotypes go to far, offending a peoples traditions and beliefs. We need to be able to differentiate between what stereotypes and jokes are okay and what ones go to far, and by speaking up, much like Teters did when offended by the way the Indian Mascot was portrayed at the University of Illinois, people are made more and more aware of what stereotypes have gone to far and why they have.

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  • Stereotypes are an issue that is very prominent in American culture. There are so many different people in the world with different backgrounds and races. Stereotypes are formed when people decide that people unlike themselves in some particular way collectively do something or act a certain way. Many stereotypes have become so well-known and “normal” that it almost seems acceptable. Both individuals and society as a whole have the power to challenge the spread of stereotypes because they are spread people to people. These are not facts, they are opinions that someone made up and it stuck. In order to defy these rampant stereotypes, individuals must stick up for the party being talked about. If one’s friend makes a joke about Asian people being poor drivers, the response needs to not be laughing or shaking it off, it needs to be to tell that person the negative effect their “harmless” joke has on society. As a society, any ads or media that indicates a stereotype of any sort and normalizes differences should be cancelled and no more should be made. People are greatly influenced by the media and many things are spread that way. In order to challenge to spread of stereotypes, they must be stopped in the areas that people pay attention to and that affects them the most, such as the media. Strategies that I see working to counteract stereotypes are people challenging things that suggest stereotypes in the media and taking steps to change them. Throughout the course we have been talking about many things dealing with stereotypes and how people are viewed. An example of how stereotypes are being challenged that we have discussed in class is the issue of the sport team mascots. The Redskins, for example, put Native American people in a negative light. People are unhappy about mascots like these and are fighting hard to have them changed so that they do not offend any person. This is a way that both an individual and society can help to defy the spread of stereotypes. The individual can stand up and petition against the mascots and society has the power to change these mascots.

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  • There’s nothing really that we can do when it comes to racism but one thing we can do is to try to prevent things form escalating. There are many stereotypes in our daily lives. But if we try to put preventions to these types of thing it will for sure die down by the time other generation will come around. They wouldn’t have a choice because it’s not there anymore right? Who knows because we can’t change the color of our skin? So what could we do now? Who knows right? This can be a hard topic to pin point things on. Well since I was born people known my race as “Samoans” I don’t know why but I’m guessing is because it’s more of them here, I really don’t know. I am Tongan and always felt like the one left out. I was really the one in all of my classes, really one out of ten Tongans at a school, and four of them were my brothers and sisters. It was kind of weird growing up. Reading “Why I Don’t Want To Talk About My Race,” I can relate to Steve Locke, People would stare at me and my sisters and brothers and no-one wanted to mess with us because we were “too big”, till this day people still comment on my size thinking I’m like 25 or 30 but I’m only 19 years old. People always ask me this one question and it gets very annoying “how do you guys get so big”? I hate that people steady asking me that question over and over again. Also they ask “If I play football”. That’s what I really hate. Like what if I’m a doctor and they don’t even know. I can be anything. They don’t know and I think that is very racial. Most people don’t think every race has a stereotype. But guess what ever race has one. But with stereotypes I think it’s really funny. No matter what race it is. Things can be all taken care of.

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  • There are many different stereotypes on every race. These stereotypes have been passed down for many years and are picked up at young ages. Before meeting someone of a different race, people tend to judge them based off of what they have heard about a certain group of people or what was confirmed when encountering a member a/that group. To try to challenge those the spreading of these stereotypes you would think the media could start showing less of the the negative things that groups a represented for. For example, black people, latinos and muslims usually are stereotyped as violent. The media (TV, News, Movies) is what is spreading these stereotypes and negative images. Today, Social Media is just as powerful when it comes to spreading these negative images. No one can stop people from spreading these point of view but the people of the stereotyped groups can alter their behavior if they truly are violent (a person who is a criminal, change their ways) But even if that happens, he or she would be subcategorized. If a black person were to do a good deed, and that image be spread through the media, their behavior would be dismissed. People who believe these stereotypes would basically say something like “Oh he’s a nice black person.. He’s not like the rest of them” Basically saying black people are violent this particular person is not. We learned in class that people dismiss anything that does not fit the stereotype. Even white people have stereotypes placed on them by other groups but it doesn’t hold them back as it does to people of color. If the media began to show more of the good things people of color do, it will eventually cause people to realize that all colored people are not violent then that and other stereotypes will eventually fade away. As long as people of color are portrayed as criminals they will continue to be behind or rather below in society. It effects getting jobs and stuff like that so when the media begins to put more stuff out about good things people of color do rather than just the negative, equality will begin to show. Right now there are still inequalities and inequities, partially because of stereotypes.

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  • Stereotypes are ideas created by individuals about other certain groups of people. Stereotypes tend to generalize a group of people based off of the way they do things. In today’s society stereotypes have become very influential part of life. I think that in order for individuals and society to challenge the decimation of stereotypes, we need to first make sense of the stereotypes that we are accusing people of. Sometimes we find ourselves judging groups of people as if every individual in that group is the same. One of the main ways we can decimate stereotypes is by looking at every individual has her own unique person instead of categorizing them into their race, social, or economic background. We can do this by incorporating what Jay Smooth calls having a “what you did..?” conversation. This conversation is meant to separate individuals from the groups of people they are stereotypically associated with by specifically looking at what that person did instead of what the group is known to do. There is nothing that we can really do to directly eliminate racism but there are steps that we can take to help dissemination the stereotypes. We need to be more noticeable of the images that normalize differences and we we see or come across then we need to discuss it with friends and people around us. These discussions will cause people to think about the images and what they stand for and create the thought that maybe these images are not right and need to not be accepted. According to the course lecture, social media brings into focus backstage racism, sexism and homophobia. We must remain conscious of what we put out in the media because it can become extremely detrimental to the progression of society in terms racial acceptance. Personally I see the idea of education in the field of race and stereotypes being most effective in helping change the ways people think about groups of people. For example I feel as if this class is opening the eyes of many young people and showing them that maybe everything they have learned or heard about certain races is not always true. Classes such as this one also challenge people to think about the things that come out of their mouths and how that might be offensive to someone else.

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