Privilege Discussion (triple participation)

Published October 9, 2014 by djlwsu

First answer each of these questions and there are several discussion below.  This is worth 25 participation points.

Air travel is relatively easy for you.

  1. Yes
  2. NO

Public access to buildings, parks, restaurants etc. is easy for you (this especially applies in small towns wherein handicap access may be limited).

  1. YES
  2. NO

 

You can use public facilities such as gym locker rooms and store changing rooms without stares, fear, or anxiety.

  1. Yes
  2. No

You have the ability to walk through the world and generally blend-in, not being constantly stared or gawked at, whispered about, pointed at, or laughed at because of your gender expression.

  1. Yes
  2. No

If you are murdered (or have any crime committed against you), your gender expression will not be used as a justification for your murder (“gay panic”) nor as a reason to coddle the perpetrators.

  1. Yes
  2. NO

Sending out a resume and not worry if you need to change name to actually get a response

  1. Yes
  2. NO

Have you ever tried to change you appearance, mannerisms, or behavior to avoid being judged or ridiculed, take one step back

  1. Yes
  2. NO

I can be as “promiscuous” as I want and not be labeled a “slut” or “whore”.

  1. YES
  2. NO

I grew up in a house with _________ books

  1. Less than 5
  2. 20-70
  3. 100-500
  4. More than 500

My family has always had health insurance

  1. YES
  2. NO

I was the first person to attend college in my family

  1. YES
  2. NO

Have you ever discouraged from academic major or a job because of race, class, gender, or sexual orientation.

  1. YES
  2. No

Were ever encouraged to attend a college by a teacher or school counselor

  1. YES
  2. No

 

Were ever discouraged to attend a college by a teacher or school counselor

  1. YES
  2. No

 

Did you have military recruiter hold an event at your high school

  1. YES
  2. No

 

Prior to age 18, you took ______ vacations out of the country

  1. None
  2. 1-2
  3. 3-5
  4. 6-8
  5. More 8

 

Have you ever assumed to be an athlete because of your race or gender

  1. YES
  2. No

Have you ever been followed in a store because of your race

  1. YES
  2. No

You are able to buy hair products locally

 

  1. YES
  2. No

Growing up, you lived within ______ mile(s) of a full service super market

  1. 1
  2. 2-3
  3. 3-4
  4. More than 5

 

 

 

We have discussed privilege for several days now.  I know this can be challenging.  In light of our conversation on Tuesday and today, I would like to discuss below: 1) your reactions to these questions and others; 2) your reactions to those privileges, both seen and unseen, especially those not discussed; confronted each and every day; 3) how these connect to short clips we watched in class today in regards to not only privileges, but costs and benefits of access to those “privileges” 4) how this might impact how you walk around campus, how you consume media, how you look at the world; and 5) why this matters.  lastly, how can one disrupt these privileges

200 words

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22 comments on “Privilege Discussion (triple participation)

  • yes
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    no
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    1
    yes
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    yes
    yes
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    yes
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    4
    I thought that some of the questions were kind of odd. For example, if I can buy my hair products locally. I had never thought I had privilege but after answering these questions I can see that I’ve never been followed at a store, or been stopped at an airport for checking. I don’t feel like I’m given privilege but I also don’t see as much discrimination as other races. Or if it does happen I just don’t acknowledge it. I also feel that the issue of privilege is more with whites and African Americans. I’ve never had to change my name on a job application. Honestly I feel like people hire me because I’m Hispanic and can speak two languages, but also it depends on geographical area. White people live longer and have better health coverage. There is also less white infant deaths than those of colored infant. Now that i know more about the privilege that is seen and unseen I think that I’m going be more aware with the type of things people can get away with. How you view privilege is important because it can either pull you up or down. For example, if you recognize you have privilege then you can use it in a positive way. Privilege can be disrupted if its recognized more and people try to not encourage it.

    Like

    • Remember, “colored” is a dated term that is no longer used. So colored infants would be appropriate

      Regarding hair products, look at this list and take a look at entire article (http://www.tolerance.org/article/racism-and-white-privilege):

      White Privilege: The Perks
      White people receive all kinds of perks as a function of their skin privilege. Consider the following:
      • When I cut my finger and go to my school or office’s first aid kit, the flesh-colored band-aid generally matches my skin tone.
      • When I stay in a hotel, the complimentary shampoo generally works with the texture of my hair.
      • When I run to the store to buy pantyhose at the last minute, the ‘nude’ color generally appears nude on my legs.
      • When I buy hair care products in a grocery store or drug store, my shampoos and conditioners are in the aisle and section labeled ‘hair care’ and not in a separate section for ‘ethnic products.’
      • I can purchase travel size bottles of my hair care products at most grocery or drug stores.

      Like

  • yes
    yes
    yes
    yes
    no
    yes
    no
    no
    100-500
    yes
    no
    no
    yes
    no
    yes
    3-5
    yes
    no
    yes
    >5

    Some of the questions, I felt, were very random. For example, “being followed in a store”, is a little out their. I have never been followed at a store nor seen anyone else being followed in a store due to ethnicity. The questions did however make me see some of the unseen privileges that I have such as having recruiters for the military come to my school or having a lot of books in my home. I never would have realized that being able to buy my hair products locally is a privilege. The one of the privileges in this survey connects with one of the clips through sexual orientation. People who are not heterosexual often get made fun of and bashed on. Vulgar terms such as “faggot” and “gay” get thrown around all the time on social media, like it was shown in the short clip about slurs on twitter. Also, health care is a privilege as well. Not everyone can afford health care but when Minorities cant afford health care, people just view it as a normal thing. These unseen privileges impact everything that revolves around us in the world. It effects how we live, what we buy, how we dress, talk to people, and see each other. Walking around campus I see certain ethnicities grouping together. A few weeks ago in one of my classes I overheard a group of guys talking about a gay person on their dorm floor and judging him for his sexual orientation. I think in order to disrupt these privileges people just have to look at each other as equals and accept that everyone has access to different things which shapes their life’s in different yet unique ways.

    Like

    • Paige: Is that what defines privilege – not having to experience, face, and live under conditions so much so that it is hard to fathom. We read this article by Coates earlier in the semester (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/07/opinion/coates-the-good-racist-people.html) where he writes: “Last month the actor Forest Whitaker was stopped in a Manhattan delicatessen by an employee. Whitaker is one of the pre-eminent actors of his generation, with a diverse and celebrated catalog ranging from “The Great Debaters” to “The Crying Game” to “Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai.” By now it is likely that he has adjusted to random strangers who can’t get his turn as Idi Amin out of their heads. But the man who approached the Oscar winner at the deli last month was in no mood for autographs. The employee stopped Whitaker, accused him of shoplifting and then promptly frisked him. The act of self-deputization was futile. Whitaker had stolen nothing. On the contrary, he’d been robbed. The deli where Whitaker was harassed happens to be in my neighborhood. Columbia University is up the street. Broadway, the main drag, is dotted with nice restaurants and classy bars that cater to beautiful people. I like my neighborhood. And I’ve patronized the deli with some regularity, often several times in a single day. I’ve sent my son in my stead. My wife would often trade small talk with whoever was working checkout. Last year when my beautiful niece visited, she loved the deli so much that I felt myself a sideshow. But it’s understandable. It’s a good deli.”

      Check out these articles, all of which talk about the ways that black youth experience profiling within stores – http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/Story?id=130912&page=1; http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/22/rashid-polo-shopping-while-black-vine_n_5610667.html; http://www.mediaite.com/tv/tamron-hall-reveals-she-gets-followed-in-department-stores-other-black-journalists-open-up-about-prejudice/; http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/29/barneys-macys-shopping-while-black-_n_4173929.html

      From this article (http://abcnews.go.com/WhatWouldYouDo/story?id=7131333&page=1)

      “In a 2007 Gallup survey, 47 percent of black people surveyed said they are not treated equally by retailers. More than one-quarter of those surveyed felt they were targeted because of their race while shopping in the last 30 days. Racial profiling lawsuits against major retailers have made headlines across the country. In 2005, Macy’s paid New York state a settlement of $600,000 after the attorney general found that the majority of people detained at a sampling of Macy’s stores were black and Latino — a disproportionately high number compared with the percentage of minorities shopping at the stores. A few years earlier, store employees at a national retail chain admitted that they were instructed to follow black customers around the store and avoid giving them large shopping bags.

      In terms of “Walking around campus I see certain ethnicities grouping together” how do you think the circulation of racial jokes, micoaggressions, etc. impacts here? Also, do we notice whites grouping together as much as we note students of color?

      Like

  • Yes
    yes
    yes
    yes
    yes
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    no
    yes
    3
    yes
    no
    no
    yes
    no
    yes
    2
    no
    no
    yes
    1

    Most of the questions did not catch me off guard, except for the one about hair at first. But after reading the first comments I now understand why that was put in. I also do not think the questions were insanely random because they were things that we have either been asked in class or things that have been constantly associated with privilege and race related disputes in the media. As for privilege, I know that I have grown up privileged, but I have never fully understood all of my privileges that go beyond the material things that I have provided for me. I now know that there are many privileges that are seen and unseen, one of my initial reactions to these privileges is surprise because of the fact that I did not realize most of my privilege at first. These privileges will not influence my walk around campus, the only thing that might happen is that I might go unnoticed from point A to B. I dont think having privilege has made me see the world differently either, I am sure I have different views than many people, but they are not spurred from my privilege. I am definitely trying to respond to social media differently, especially after seeing the website that counted homophobic term use on twitter. I think something that can help people disrupt privilege is understanding that everyone has it, it depends on where you are from and aspects like that, but there are always things that can be looked at as privilege. Once this is done people will find it much easier to talk about privilege.

    Like

  • Yes
    YES
    Yes
    Yes
    NO
    Yes
    Yes
    YES
    100-500
    YES
    YES
    No
    YES
    No
    YES
    1-2
    No
    No
    YES
    1

    My reactions to these question made me think how privilege I am because I haven’t had any bad experience within the society, by them looking down on me. As I was looking answering the questions, they all seemed pretty normal to me but one question that stood out to me was “Growing up, you lived within___ mile(s) of a full service super market.” I don’t understand how that suppose to be a privilege. Does it apply to the neighborhood you live meaning how nice of the area it is? At time I don’t really think that I’am that privilege but now that I think about it I am. For college I received many scholarships because I was hispanic and other people weren’t able to get that scholarship because they where white. By speaking two languages, I am more privilege then others because I have the ability to understand other people and be helpful at a job or at school if anyone needs translation in spanish. When we saw the website about the name calling on twitter, it shocked me because I didn’t really think of how much people use those words. If we all thought how we say stuff before putting it on social media then it will help about by not offending anyone. A way to disrupt privileges if everyone used their privileges in good way and not over use it.

    Like

    • Brenda: We will watch a film about food insecurity but think about film from yesterday and health disparities – how does access to fresh fruits and vegetables impact here? Also, how does the existence of full service market impact cost – are the costs of foods as small stores different than super markets? Also, how might hunger impact, say, kids learning ability?

      Like

  • Yes
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    2
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    1
    A lot of the questions that were asked about privileges were random. But if you think about the deeper meanings behind them you can see certain privileges coming out. I never thought about the questions in a deeper context. I knew growing up that I had privileges however I did not know to what extent those privileges went. The questions that were asked made me realize the privileges that I have compared to other people. For example being able to buy hair products locally I never thought about others and that is one privilege that I have. Everyone has some kind of privilege however some people may have more privileges than others. Even though some privileges are not as easily seen compared to others, they still make an impact in this world and how others are viewed. Each of these privileges impacts the lives of others. For example after seeing the homophobic words that are used on twitter and other social media sites that is showing privilege against homosexuals. To help stop these privileges from affecting others we need to stand up when we see it happening. In order to see past theses privileges we need to view everyone as equal individuals and no one individual is greater than another one.

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  • 1. Yes
    2. Yes
    3. Yes
    4. Yes
    5. Yes
    6. No
    7. Yes
    8. No
    9. 20-70
    10. No
    11. No
    12. No
    13. Yes
    14. No
    15. Yes
    16. 1-2
    17. No
    18. No
    19. Yes
    20. 2-3

    My reaction to these questions really showed me how privileged I am to not have encountered any of these actions to say the least. Although I am Korean/white I’ve never been judged out of my character because of my race or the way I look because I am light skinned and look more White than Korean. I know I am privileged especially when I am applying to get a job. My best friend who is Black has applied for many of the same jobs I have, but because her name is not a typical American name like mine if, I get the call back and she normally doesn’t. Majority of the time I don’t notice the way I am treated compared to other races, but I also think its because I choose not to pay attention to it. It was shocking to see how many times the terms are used on twitter and how oblivious people were when they would use it. A lot of the words are used now not to actually offend someone, but just words to throw into sentences. These discussions open my eyes to see things I didn’t notice before and allows me to see the difference in the way I am treated opposed to others with different ethnicities are treated. I think ways to disrupt these privileges to acknowledge that they are there and people to should act on them. Just like the video of the Black women at the grocery store had her sister who was black and white stand up for her and used her privilege to stop the humiliation of the black women.

    Like

  • yes
    yes
    yes
    yes
    yes
    yes
    no
    20-70
    no
    no
    yes
    yes
    no
    no
    3-5
    yes
    yes
    more than 5

    Most of the questions were a little random but I can see why they were asked, they do tie into privilege and what we have been discussing in class. Some of the questions were not surprising to me. Personally, I have been followed around when I was in a store, I have been stopped and asked to show a receipt for the groceries I have purchased, so for me I expect these things because they have happened before. I have mixed feelings about privilege, I have some privileges like being bilingual, I’m getting a college education, and I have a loving family, I feel like these are very important privileges. However, I am a Hispanic female, so I feel like I get the short end of the stick sometimes. I am very lucky that don’t have to worry about extreme discrimination. I try not to be upset that I don’t have the same privileges as a white male will have, I think it is sad that the idea of everyone being equal feels so far out of reach. In the “Everyday Discrimination, Everyday Privilege” video, the half white half black sister-in-law went through the checkout lane without any problems. When her sister-in-law who is black, went through she got asked for two forms of I.D. and after writing a check, it was compared to the “bad check” book. Her sister-in-law benefits from white privilege and used it to stand up and say what was happening was wrong.

    Like

  • Yes
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    1
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    2
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    1
    The questions were sort of weird such as “How many books did you have in your household.” Then i figured a lot of these small detailed questions does explain your family income and what you are privileged to, in my case i do not have a lot of access and privilege. My reaction to these set of questions was that it suprised me on my privileges and how my life is the same and different from others. This made remember a clip we watched in lecture, it was about two different black kids who went to a different school. One had more access to an education because of the school system and not having such a low budget. Living in a very diverse community at the age of 10 i went to a school that had a low budget, i did not get a lot of access to good teachers and the right education. That was until i moved in with my uncle in a white neighborhood in 7th grade. Huge transition, school was very clean, more clubs, strict dress code, and not so diverse. It was so crazy how behind i was in school but it wasn’t because i didn’t pay attention in class, (because i did) it was because i wasn’t supposed to have that privilege. It’s crazy how many people do not have these privileges, the only reason i did was because i made the commitment to give up seeing my family less often just to get a right education. It definitively matters because like i said, there are a lot of people who do not have the privilege to even get an education and they should! We should be able to pursue dreams with privileges getting in the way. As you can see I have been using education for an example, how we could disrupt these privileges is one way those with privileges could make just a little contribution to those with no privileges such as volunteering.

    Like

  • 1. yes
    2. yes
    3. yes
    4. yes
    5. yes
    6. yes
    7. yes
    8. no
    9. 100-500
    10. yes
    11. no
    12. no
    13. yes
    14. no
    15. yes
    16. more than 8
    17. no
    18. no
    19. yes
    20. more than 5

    I felt that these questions were very random and did not really correlate with each other. For instance the question about military members coming and recruiting at the school do not match up with the question about being followed at a store or finding hair products for yourself or how many times you have been outside of the country. Looking at the questions it seems that they do relate to privilege because not everyone gets the chance to go on vacations or fly in an airplane or own 500 books because they cannot afford it. These questions made me think of a clip that we watched in class that was about white people privileges vs black privileges and how something of the exact same thing can be taken completely different coming from a black person vs a white person. The question about being followed around a store made me think of the clip where the lady working the cash register at a store was discriminating against a black woman and the white women noticed and stood up for her. This impacts the way I walk around campus and look at the rest of the world because it makes me realize that I am very privileged as income is never something my family has struggled with and we have always had the opportunity to do fun trips and family vacations. It makes me not want to brag about the things I have because a lot of people probably haven’t experienced the things that I have. It also makes me look at the world and understand that money isn’t something that brings happiness because some of the wealthiest people are unhappy and the most poor are happiest because they are constantly in the company of their loved ones and not objects. These questions each matter because the relate to not only the comparison of different ethnicities and the privileges a white person may have over a colored person but also the comparison of genders and family ranking as far as income goes because some people may not even be able to answer the questions above such as “do planes give you anxiety” because they have never had the opportunity to even be in one. They are really just an eye opener to real life and the different types of people and obstacles that exist for every person.

    Like

    • Jadelyn: Not random but reflecting a host of privileges that we might see. For example, does it surprise you that military recruiters don’t go to private schools or prep schools? What does that reveal? What does it reveal that those neighborhoods where military recruiters are likely to focus on – those of youth of color; the poor – are also likely to be spaces where surveillance and profiling takes place whether from the police or shop owners. What does this reveal … so yes, a range and get us to think about race, ability, class, gender, sexuality as it relates to privilege but also think about interconnections

      Like

  • 1)yes
    2) yes
    3)yes
    4) yes
    5) no
    6)yes
    7) yes
    8) no
    9) 20-70 books
    10) no
    11) no
    12) yes
    13) yes
    14)no
    15)yes
    16) 1-2 Vacations
    17)no
    18)no
    19)yes
    20) 1 mile

    These question pose curious thoughts for me. The amount of privileges that certain groups of people are receiving and not even consciously aware about is puzzling. I have never stopped and taken the time to consider that having more then 5 books in my house was a privilege I was given that’s has been the result of a positive feedback loop. What once was my great great grandfather buying a house is now me having literacy and a significant amount of diverse readings under my belt. I believe that if you have a certain type hair that is not common, you do need certain hair care products but will those products be available close by? Typically the answer is no. Despite the typical thoughts on “black girl hair” vs “white girl hair” even considering male vs. female is interesting. Males will have a far easier time finding the products they need, if any at all compared to a female. That is a privilege. In class, we watched a video that took into account the number of infant mortality losses based on race. Black women have a higher loss rate. That is typically because daily race pressures and issues cause stress. That stress can negatively impact the health of both a mother and unborn child. White women may even get better health care and more frequent doctor visits prior to birth. To be a white pregnant woman proves to be better (a privilege) than being a black pregnant woman. When one takes a step back to realize the privileges resulting from being a certain race, gender, etc. you may notice odd things. That black guy walking down the street at midnight after working out at the gym will be feared but the shrimpy white guy walking back at 12:30 is just trying to get back home and is safe. The girl wearing a short skirt is labeled as overly provocative but the guy with a shirt off and pants hanging far too low is just some “cool” guy. The general public will assume things like those because that’s what they have been taught over time. These small stereotypes are built into a large system that all interact with each other. A certain race, for instance black people would see a black guy knocking a woman over to get off a bus as an act of being late for something, but if a white person were to see that encounter they might consider that an act of violence. Who we are defines often determines how we look at the world and those around us. These observations result in privilege for a certain race or gender and other classifications. By asking questions like these to large groups of people, a message on privilege could be spread out across all sorts of classifications of people. White people may understand what privileges they are receiving, black people would understand how degraded they are in certain regards, and males may start to understand the benefits of being what can be considered a “superior gender.” Understanding leads to progress.

    Like

  • YES
    YES
    YES
    YES
    NO
    NO
    YES
    NO
    100-500
    YES
    NO
    NO
    YES
    NO
    YES
    1-2
    NO
    NO
    YES
    1 mile
    The questions made me rethink how I experience privilege in everyday life. Small things like having hair products easily available or nude bandaids matching my skin color go unnoticed to me, but stand out to those who don’t experience those privileges. Then it carries over into the more noticeable privileges like always having health insurance and being exposed to college recruitment from teachers and family. For me, it was the unnoticed privileges like buying products where I don’t need to think twice about it that stood out to me. I have taken notice of the difference in opportunity for things like health insurance and employment, however. In regard to the clips watched in class, the part about early deaths in communities facilitating other early deaths related to some of the blog questions. Specifically the ones about health insurance and being encouraged to attend college. If one has that privilege, it significantly reduces stress in multiple aspects of life. In the video, it highlighted those who are under the poverty line or consistently under stress. The stress contributes to poor health conditions which reinforce over time. That results in the people who experience privilege not having to deal with the consequences non privilege. Disrupting privilege is difficult because it is so deeply embedded in the average day and has grown through history. By being aware of privileges and individual experiences, it can help slowly reduce the extreme deficit between those who benefit and those who don’t.

    Like

  • Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    4
    No
    Neither of my parents went to college, but both my older siblings did.
    No
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    4
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    3

    As a white male, I haven’t thought about very many of these things. I know specifically how many books, hair care products for me, and how people would react to my murder, were interesting to me. One thing I have thought about a lot is not having health insurance. Throughout my life I’ve known I probably wouldn’t go to the hospital unless it was a very bad accident. That’s been difficult, but obviously in the grand scheme of things, it’s only a thought every once in a while, I don’t have to be reminded of it daily.

    I’ve become very aware through this class just how privileged I am. I’ve been consistently normal, almost proud of how normal I am. I’ve always been able to fit in, even if I didn’t have friends, I didn’t stick out in any way. Just the fact that I could live my life every day without thinking about how people treat me differently due to something I can’t change about myself is a huge privilege in itself.

    I think these all relate very well to basic privileges we’ve been learning about lately. Some examples being the difference in infant mortality between races, even between those of similar economic status. The amount of physical and mental stress that minorities have to go through everyday really hurts in the long run. Some of these questions that I’ve never thought about, such as a close supermarket, books around the house, being followed in a store because of my race are all things that can greatly help someone if they have them, but greatly increase stress without them.

    My privilege also carries over into how I’m able to act and feel like a normal person on campus. I don’t have to worry about people giving me second glances, or not having people that look like me in my classes. I’ve never had to speak for my entire race before, or have people judge me because of something a single person in my “race” did. I’m able to look at news headlines and not think about whether or not someone is attacking a person because of they share my skin color. I’m able to look at people writing things as people writing things, not because someone has an immense amount of bias built up inside of themselves.

    This all matters because of how it affects those around us. Everyone deserves these things. Everyone should have the chance to go to college, have access to good food and reading materials, and to be able to feel like they fit in. I feel like we can change these things by helping out those less fortunate, especially through legislation. Obviously people being nice to each other is good, and can help out, but minorities won’t be able to actually overcome the real adversity. Locked in privileges, and built up wealth are what’s helping white people stay on top, while minorities don’t have the same opportunities. White people have family legacies with colleges, built up wealth in the form of home mortgages, job recommendations and networking, along with many other things. I think legislation in the form of affirmative action could go a long way to equalize the playing field. As it is, statistics show names considered to be typical black names have call back rates of only 50% as much as white names, even with the same credentials. This has to change if we ever expect a truly level playing field.

    Like

  • 1.Yes
    2.Yes
    3.Yes
    4.Yes
    5.Yes
    6. No
    7.Yes
    8.No
    9.100-500
    10.Yes
    11.No
    12.No
    13.Yes
    14.No
    15.No
    16.3-5
    17.No
    18.No
    19.Yes
    20.1

    I found some of these questions to be thought provoking and others to be very random and irrelevant. The questions regarding how comfortable I feel in an airplane and whether or not I can buy hair products in my area kind of threw me off and I wasn’t sure how they related to this class. But for all of the questions that I felt were relevant to class actually made me think about the relationship my answers had with anyone who wasn’t white and how that impacted their lives. I truly believe that these privileges play a major part still in society today regardless of everyone saying they’re opposed to race. When we talk about costs and benefits of having access to these “privileges” that people have the first thing that jumps into my mind was the in-class film about teenagers who didn’t have access to fresh fruits and vegetables in their life. From this film we learn that these setbacks slowed down growth and the learning ability of a growing teen. Whenever I walk around campus it never has been instilled into my mind to judge someone based off of their appearance and I hope to continue that approach day-to-day. When I consume media and think back to class and I realize how shocking it is that people use the word “gay” and “faggot” so frequently despite how insulting those words can be and that’s one of the main reasons why I try to avoid social media in general. I believe that privilege can be disrupted in society if more people continue to step up on an every day basis to try and discourage sexism, racism, and hate among particular groups.

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  • Yes
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    3
    Yes
    No
    No
    Yes
    No
    No
    2
    No
    No
    Yes
    1

    The questions were mostly what I would expect, except for hair products. However, most questions I believed were targeted against women and minority races. (ex. “I can be as ‘promiscuous’ as I want and not be labeled a ‘slut’ or ‘whore’”.), (ex. “sending out a resume and not worry if you need to change name to actually get a response”). I have always believed that I was privileged growing up in a supportive family, with no financial troubles, and being treated well by teachers, and councilors. As well as being able to walk through the world and blend in, not being perceived as “different”. I have noticed some privileges before this class such as finical stability, but I was shocked at the many other privileges that I possess without me even realizing it (until now). These unseen privileges have impacted how I have interacted with others, and have mended the person I am today, the only thing is that I didn’t realize these privileges until it was made apparent through this class. My privileges have not, and most likely, will not affect how i walk around campus. It has only made me more grateful of the way I was brought up. The way i see media and the world will also not change too dramatically. I have a brother who is gay and growing up I was always sensitive to the way people put down gays with cruel words. The example of the website with homophobic words on it brought me back to past experiences where fellow students and even friends would use those words, and I let them know how offensive it is. I realize now, that they were not privileged enough to know what those words really meant and how it feels. Understanding ones privileges matters because once people are aware of the privileges they possess, they become more aware of the world and those less fortunate to possess those privileges. This is important because we will be able to disrupt privileges by realizing our own fortune and treating those less fortunate, the same as you would treat someone as fortunate as yourself.

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  • Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    20-70
    No
    Neither of my parents went to college, but my sister did.
    No
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    None
    No
    No
    Yes
    2-3

    I thought many some of the questions asked were odd and before this I never thought I had some of the privilege that this questions make me realized; I never thought of them as privilege. Questions like if I can buy my hair products locally and if I was followed at store was little odd. But when I started to think deeper about the questions makes sense and shows the hidden privilege on each of the questions. I have never been followed at a store. One of the privileges I have is having recruiters for the military come to my school and also having a lot of books in my home. Now I feel that the issue of privilege is more with whites and African Americans. The questions make me realize that being able to buy my hair products locally is a privilege. I’ve never had to change my name on a job application but that is not the same for other people of different races. Also, health care is a privilege as well and my family did not always had that. Not everyone can afford health care but when minorities cannot afford health care, people just view it as a normal thing. At time I don’t really think that I’m that privileged but now that I think about it I am privileged. My ability to speak three languages, I am more privileged then others because I have the ability to understand other people and be helpful at a job or at school. I think we all need to recognize and accept the fact that we all have some sort of privilege and we should use it in a positive way.

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  • 1. Yes
    2. Yes
    3. Yes
    4. Yes
    5. No
    6. No
    7. Yes
    8. No
    9. 20-70
    10. Yes
    11. No
    12. No
    13. No
    14. No
    15. Yes
    16. More 8
    17. No
    18. Yes
    19. Yes
    20. 1

    These questions were not anything that I didn’t notice before. But, growing up on a based where everything is pretty much perfect, I did not encounter these situations until I reached middle school which is when I moved to southern California. For example, the question that asks about the locker room situation, I never even thought about it until it was brought up. In the states, I never got a rude look or sensed any type of anxiety but when I lived in Japan I received many looks because I was really different from them on the outside. Also, the question about hair products, I never really thought about it because I can get hair products anywhere because I am not too picky about it and my hair is different from my roommates who has to buy them from a certain store dedicated to hair supplies. So, most of these question were pretty common but some of them really stood out to me because I never really thought about it since I lived in a middle class privileged military on base life.

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  • 1. No
    2. Yes
    3. No
    4. No
    5. No
    6. No
    7. Yes
    8. Yes
    9. 20-70
    10. Yes
    11. Yes
    12. Yes
    13. Yes
    14. Yes
    15. Yes
    16. None
    17. Yes
    18. Yes
    19. No
    20. More than 5

    These questions were something that occurs daily and did not catch me off guard. Some of these things are something that I have to live with as a minority in America. My reaction to those privileges that males have are somewhat an advantage in a sense that this society is most likely resembles a patriarchal society. Some privileges are advantages such as “white privileges” which allows Caucasians to walk around with a sense of entitlement and a different perception of the world than people of color. People of color have faced many challenges in the world over the past 80 years that have affected today’s society where it places white people in a better lifestyle. These acts were not that long ago and it was not just represented in the south. This impacts my view on the world and how I perceive things because I have faced discrimination and unjust acts that have shaped the way I view things.

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  • 1. Yes
    2. Yes
    3. Yes
    4. No
    5. No
    6. Yes
    7. Yes
    8. No
    9. 2
    10. Yes
    11. Yes
    12. No
    13. Yes
    14. No
    15. No
    16. 1
    17. No
    18. No
    19. Yes
    20. 3

    It was interesting to identify my privilege. After answering all questions I realize, I do have privilege? My skin color is brown so I think I am not as privilege as white people. I never imagine me having privilege over something. I realize privileges are invisible within people and within certain community. The questions were interesting to answer but comparing answer with somebody else was more interesting. It gives you visual how and why they are more privilege than you or somebody else. If you compare your answer with minority or black people, you will be shock to see huge different and privilege disparity. It is not easy to see small privilege unless they are presented to you but when you see it will surprising. I heard story in class black guy getting followed in store and I am not surprise because I seen that happening in Seattle.
    Watching this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fa0jsXFbu7I
    Black guy get followed in store!

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